Lesson "A letter to a new born son", 11th grade

Ким Р.П., учитель английского языка29 Октября, 2015 10:17

The theme:  A letter  to a new born son.

The aims:     To develop habits of listening and speaking.

The objectives: To develop students’ fluency.

                             To teach  to make conclusions

                             To enrich students ‘ outlook

Equipments: Active board, audio records , PC , handouts.

    Type of the lesson:  Lesson of fixation of knowledge and of developing skills and abilities          

                  Plan of the lesson:

1 Warm up

Look at the pictures and guess what the theme of the lesson is.

You were asked to know what your parents to dream or think of while they were       waiting for your appearance

2. Presentation: Prediction

Read  and say

What could he have written  about so that the letter has  touched the readers so much?

Reading and listening

Letter to a newborn son

1 Read these lines from the letter and

Answer  the questions below

Read and listen to the first part of the letter. (Group 1)

Are these statements true or false?

 Correct the false ones.

Answer the questions.

1 Who are these people? How are they connected to the places?

What indications are there that Fergal's parents loved him and each other?

Describe his father. What is Fergal's attitude to him and his problems? What regrets does he have about his father?

3. Follow up:

What do you think?

Production:

Work on the song “Father and son”

 1      Why do teenagers often feel misunderstood by their parents and dream of leaving home to start a life of their own?

 

What advice would you give to a young person feeling this way?

2      Decide if the sentences below are

 A: The conservative advice of a parent от B: The radical advice of a friend.

 Write A or B.

 Which of these pieces of advice would you give to a young person?

 3      Listen to the song. What does the father advise? How does the son feel?

 

 4      Look at these phrases from the song. What do you think they mean?

 

5      You  a teenager.  What are you like ? Are you rebellious and eager to escape the restrictions of home? What words of wisdom might influence you ? Who do you listen to?

Imagine you are going to have a son whatWould you like to tell him/

6.  Wrap up: Hometask: .s/b   ex.7,8  p.56

3. S/B expressions from the text

Outline

Warm up

Prediction:

1.         Look at the pictures and guess what the theme of the lesson is.

    2.          You were asked to know what your parents to dream or think of while they were       waiting for your appearance?

Presentation

Prediction

Read  and say

What could he have written  about so that the letter has  touched the readers so much?

The letter to a new-born son which touched the hearts of millions

Tony Grant, producer of From Our Own Correspondent, in the FOOC office in Broadcasting HouseTony Grant, the producer of BBC Radio 4's From Our Own Correspondent programme, explains how a report from correspondent Fergal Keane in 1996 became a radio classic. I phoned him in Hong Kong a few days before the birth. He was as anxious - or was it terrified - as any father expecting his first baby. Having just had a child myself I, of course,I  considered myself an established expert on of fatherhood. As we talked of how the birth would affect him and Anne, and how it might change his attitudes to journalism and being a foreign correspondent, I asked him to do a piece for From Our Own Correspondent after the baby was born. He was not enthusiastic.

But when I phoned again, after the birth, to offer my congratulations and again asked him to tell us how he felt, he was so overtaken by fatherhood, so surprised and overjoyed ... and with so much to say about it, that he agreed. His letter was played down in Hong Kong during the early hours of February the 15th, 1996.Immediately after the programme had gone out, the telephone hadn't stopped ... the fax machine was jammed ... the BBC Information Office was trying to get more details from us ... and there were calls from several national newspapers.

During the course of that afternoon, I spoke to perhaps a hundred people It was hard to do any other business that week. Within seven days we'd taken close on a thousand calls. No other piece of radio I've been involved with has had a similar response.In the months which followed, the text was published in various newspapers and magazines

Reading and listening

Letter to a newborn son

Fergal Keane is a BBC foreign correspondent. He recorded this letter to his newborn son for a programme called From Our Own Correspondent while he was working in Hong Kong. Following the broadcast, hundreds of people jammed the BBC switchboard in tears because they were so moved by his words.

1 Read these lines from the letter and

Answer  the questions below.

•             You are asleep cradled in my left arm and

             I am learning the art of one-handed typing.

•             One man said you were the first baby to be born in the block in the year of the Pig.

•             Your coming has turned me upside down and inside out.

•             Like many foreign correspondents I know, I have lived a life that, on occasion, has veered close        to the edge: war zones, natural disasters, darkness in all its shapes and forms.

•             And it's also true that I am pained, perhaps haunted is a better word, by the memory, suddenly so vivid now, of each suffering child I have come across on my journeys.

•             But there is something more, a story from long ago that I will tell you face to face, father and son, when you are older. It's a very personal story...

1             What do the lines tell you about Fergal's feelings on the birth of his son?

2             What is the year of the Pig?

3             What do you learn of his job as a foreign correspondent?

4             What do you think the personal story from long ago might be?

2 T.  Read and listen to the first part of the letter. (Group 1)

 Answer the questions.

1          What has Fergal learned about the practicalities of looking after a newborn baby?

2          What do you understand by the new grammar of their daily lives?

3          Why are the Chinese people in their apartment block so pleased?

4          Is fatherhood as he expected it would be?

A letter to a newborn son

My dear son,

It is six o'clock in the morning on the island of Hong Kong. You are asleep cradled in my left arm and I am learning the art of one-handed typing. Your mother, more tired yet more happy than I've ever known her, is sound asleep in die room next door and there is a soft quiet in our apartment. Since you've arrived, days have melted into night and back again and we are learning a new grammar, a long sentence whose punctuation marks are feeding and winding and nappy changing and these occasional moments of quiet.

When you're older we'll tell you that you were born in Britain's last Asian colony in the lunar year of the Pig and that when we brought you home, die staff of our apartment block gathered to wish you well. 'It's a boy, so lucky, so lucky. We Chinese love boys,' they told us. One man said you were the first baby to be born in the block in the year of the Pig. This, he told us, was good Feng Shui, in other words a positive sign for the building and everyone who lived there. Naturally your mother and I were only too happy to believe that. We had wanted you and waited for you, imagined you and dreamed about you and now that you are here no dream can do justice to you.

3 T. listen only to part two.  (Group 2)

We have called you Daniel Patrick, but I've been told by my Chinese friends that you should have a Chinese name as well and this glorious dawn sky makes me think we'll call you Son of the Eastern Star. Your coming has turned me upside down and inside out. So much that seemed essential to me has, in the past few days, taken on a different colour. Like many foreign correspondents I know, I have lived a life that, on occasion, has veered close to the edge: war zones, natural disasters, darkness in all its shapes and forms. In a world of insecurity and ambition and ego, it's easy to be drawn in, to take chances with our lives, to gamble with death. Now, looking at your sleeping face, listening to your occasional sigh, I wonder how I could have ever thought glory and prizes were sweeter than life.

And it's also true that I am pained, perhaps haunted is a better word, by the memory, suddenly so vivid now, of each suffering child I have come across on my journeys. To tell you the truth, it's nearly too much to bear at this moment to even think of children being hurt and abused. And yet, looking at you, the images come flooding back. Ten-year-old Andi Mikail on a hillside in Eritrea, how his voice cried out, when the wind blew dust on to his wounds. The two brothers, Domingo and Juste, in Menongue, southern Angola. Juste, two years old and dying from malnutrition, being carried on seven-year-old Domingo's back. And Domingo's words to me, ‘He was nice before, but now he has the hunger.'

Last October, in Afghanistan, when you were growing inside your mother, I met Sharja, aged twelve. Motherless, fatherless, guiding me through the grey ruins of her home, everything was gone, she told me. And I knew that, for all her tender years, she had learned more about loss than 1 would understand in a lifetime. There is one last memory, of Rwanda, where, in a ransacked classroom, I found a mother and her three young children huddled together. The children had died holding on to their mother, that instinct we all learn from birth and in one way or another cling on to until we die.

 Are these statements true or false?

 Correct the false ones.

1          His Chinese friends say that his son has to be given a Chinese name.

2          He might call him Son of the Eastern Star after the beautiful sunrise.

3          He used to be very ambitious in his work.

Andi Mikail from Eritrea Sharja from Afghanistan

4          These children he mentions were all hurt in floods.

Domingo and Juste from southern Angola Three young children from Rwanda

Read and listen to part three.  (Group 3)

Part three

Daniel, these memories explain some of the fierce protectiveness I feel for you, the tenderness and the occasional moments of blind terror when I imagine anything happening to you. But there is something more, a story from long ago that I will tell you face to face, father and son, when you are older. It's a very personal story but it's part of the picture. It has to do with the long lines of blood and family, about our lives and how we can get lost in them and, if we're lucky, find our way out again into the sunlight.

It begins thirty-five years ago in a big city on a January morning with snow on the ground and a woman walking to the hospital to have her first baby. She is in her early twenties and the city is still strange to her, bigger and noisier than the easy streets and gentle hills of her distant home. She's walking because there is no money and everything of value has been pawned to pay for the alcohol to which her husband has become addicted. On the way, a taxi driver notices her sitting, exhausted and cold, in the doorway of a shop and he takes her to hospital for free. Later that day, she gives birth to a baby boy and, just as you are to me, he is the best thing she has ever seen. Her husband comes that night and weeps with joy when he sees his son. He is truly happy. Hungover, broke, but in his own way happy, for they were both young and in love with each other and their son.

But, Daniel, time had some bad surprises in store for them. The cancer of alcoholism ate away at the man and he lost his family. This was not something he meant to do or wanted to do, it just was. When you are older, my son, you will learn about how complicated life becomes, how we can lose our way and how people get hurt inside and out. By the time his son had grown up, the man lived away from his family, on his own in a one-roomed flat, living and dying for the bottle. He died on the fifth of January, one day before the anniversary of his son's birth, all those years before in that snowbound city. But his son was too far away to hear his last words, his final breath, and all the things they might have wished to say to one another were left unspoken.

Yet now, Daniel, I must tell you that when you let out your first powerful cry in the delivery room of the Adventist Hospital and I became a father, I thought of your grandfather and, foolish though it may seem, hoped that in some way he could hear, across the infinity between the living and the dead, your proud statement of arrival. For if he could hear, he would recognize the distinct voice of family, the sound of hope and new beginnings that you and all your innocence and freshness have brought to the world.

Answer the questions.

a young woman          - a snowbound big city

a taxi driver    - a shop doorway

an alcoholic man        - a one-roomed flat

a baby boy      - the Adventist Hospital

1 Who are these people? How are they connected to the places?

What indications are there that Fergal's parents loved him and each other?

Describe his father. What is Fergal's attitude to him and his problems? What regrets does he have about his father?

Follow up

What do you think?

•          What does Fergal Keane mean when he says:

'So much that seemed essential to me has, in the past few days, taken on a different colour.'

•          How will his relationship with his son differ from the one with his own father?

•          What lessons about life does Fergal Keane want his son to learn from this letter?

•          Which parts of the letter do you think particularly moved the listeners to the BBC?

•          What lessons have you learned from your upbringing that you would like to pass on to your children?

Discuss the quotation

‘When I was fourteen years old, I was amazed at how unintelligent my father was. By the time I turned twenty-one, I was astounded by how much he had learned in the last seven years.'

 Mark Twain

Work on the song “Father and son”

 

6      Why do teenagers often feel misunderstood by their parents and dream of leaving home to start a life of their own?

What advice would you give to a young person feeling this way?

7      Decide if the sentences below are

A: The conservative advice of a parent от B: The radical advice of a friend.

 Write A or B.

It's not time to make a change  Just relax You should settle down and get married.       

You only live once.

You've just got to get away and live a little.    

Just take it easy - don't rush into things.

You ought to take your time and think things through.

You're vegetating at home - get a life.

And I know that it's not easy

Which of these pieces of advice would you give to a young person?

8      Listen to the song. What does the father advise? How does the son feel?

9      Look at these phrases from the song. What do you think they mean?

1    you're still young, that's your fault

2     you will still be here tomorrow but your dreams may not

3      it's them they know not me

10   You  a teenager.  What are you like ? Are you rebellious and eager to escape the restrictions of home? What words of wisdom might influence you ? Who do you listen to?

Imagine you are going to have a son what would you like to tell him about.

Hometask: .s/b   ex.7,8  p.56

3. S/B expressions from the text

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